Against 'Us' and 'Them': Reframing the Migration Question

by Luke Davies

The resurgence of the right in the EU – and of hostility towards migrants – is a direct result of the gross inequality that has resulted from the EU's failure to safeguard against an economic downturn with anything akin to a federal reserve, its insistence on making poorer nations pay for the recklessness of European banks, and its compulsory programmes of austerity. In short, the rise of fascism in Europe today is a byproduct of the EU's laissez-faire economics. [read full essay]

The Question of Age

Robert Pogue Harrison, Juvenescence: A Cultural History of Our Age

reviewed by Peter Marshall

In the preface to his new book, Juvenescence: A Cultural History of Our Age, Robert Harrison states that the question his book intends to examine, ‘How old are we?’ specifically refers to the ‘we’ of post-war America, and sets readers up for what we can assume will be a cultural critique by way of a philosophic and historic reflection on the phenomenon of age. There are plenty of instances when one should trust the work more than the author, and this is one. Though Juvenescence is... [read more]

Intoxicology

Johann Hari, Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs

reviewed by Stuart Walton

'Of the making of books about drugs these days, there seems no end,' said Nicholas Lezard in the Guardian, opening a review of my own contribution to the field 14 years ago. And nor should there be. While the amorphous terminology never changes, drugs – by which we might mean the entire field of intoxication practices, licit and illicit – go on multiplying as fast as freelance laboratories can alter their molecular structures to produce new compounds. Meanwhile, the ancestral substances... [read more]
 

Moonbeams on Her Brow

Daisy Hay, Mr & Mrs Disraeli: A Strange Romance

reviewed by Polly Bull

In 1868, Mary Anne Disraeli was awarded a peerage by Queen Victoria. With the new title of Viscountess Beaconsfield, she became a darling of the English public. Newspapers sang her praises, calling her the ‘First Rose of England’ and claiming that the Queen had never done ‘a more popular act’. Mary Anne was seen as the ideal wife of a great man: the outgoing Prime Minister, Benjamin Disraeli. The new title not only recognised her own virtue, but that of a husband who had asked the Queen... [read more]

Rival Dealer

Alexander R. Galloway, Laruelle: Against the Digital

reviewed by Dominic Fox

Philosophy promises something. Students of philosophy are enticed by this promise; amateur philosophers keep the flame alive. Professional philosophers are in a sense professional promisers, makers and curators of philosophical promises. No matter how skeptical or reticent they may be, how epistemically humble or ontologically parsimonious, they maintain the promissory structure of philosophy. One day, but not yet – not yet, but soon – philosophy will deliver on its promise. The... [read more]
 

Forever Love

Sam Riviere, Kim Kardashian's Marriage

reviewed by Frith Taylor

'When did poems start having to fuck with people constantly?' Sam Riviere, 2014. With Kim Kardashian's Marriage, Sam Riviere continues many of the themes of his earlier collections, 81 Austerities (2012) and Standard Twin Fantasy (2014). An uncompromising examination of contemporary life, this collection explores ideas of celebrity, artifice, performance and voyeurism, with the humour and irreverence that has become characteristic of Riviere's poetry. Charting Kim Kardashian's 72-day... [read more]

99% of 1.2 Billion

Arundhati Roy, Capitalism: A Ghost Story

reviewed by Maya Osborne

Capitalism is a greedy, vampiric fiend in Arundhati Roy’s Capitalism: A Ghost Story. It gnaws at the lifelines of well over 99% of India’s population and mainlines its acquired riches into a select few bejewelled, oily capitalists. In a nod to the Occupy! movement, she proclaims: ‘[the 1%] say that we don’t have demands … they don’t know, perhaps, that our anger alone would be enough to destroy them.’ The first page of the first essay sets the tone: ‘in a nation of 1.2 billion,... [read more]
 

'Events Are Dust'

Frances Stracey, Constructed Situations: A New History of the Situationist International

reviewed by Julian Cosma

Winston Churchill’s approach to communism, especially in the interwar period, was distinctly, almost obsessively epidemiological. His speeches and essays were peppered with quotes such as ‘Bolshevism is not a policy, it is a disease’ or alternatively, a ‘pestilence’. Individual figures were not exempt from medical designation. Lenin was a German-bred bacillus sent to inflect Russia, and Trotsky was ‘like the cancer bacillus.’ This anti-bolshevism was buttressed by respect for... [read more]

The Stuff Behind It

Sarah Waters, The Paying Guests

reviewed by Eli Davies

In an interview a few years ago, Sarah Waters outlined a kind of mission statement. 'What I'm after,' she said, 'is a gripping read, with stuff going on behind it.' The romp-factor of Waters’s fiction is well-known, and is probably at its most potent in 2002’s Fingersmith, which was, in part, an homage to Victorian crime fiction. On the surface her style, though studded with the language of her historical period, is plain and unfussy, and this may sometimes give the reader a feeling that... [read more]
 

‘He used to say it was frenzied, but beautiful’

Paul Fung, Dostoevsky and the Epileptic Mode of Being

reviewed by Andre van Loon

The trouble with Dostoevsky can be knowing where to start. It doesn't seem to matter if you're a novice reader, a seasoned aesthete or a professional literary critic. He's too verbose, too serious; too intent on piercing the heart of the matter in hand (‘and till my ghastly tale is told/this heart within me burns’, as Coleridge’s Ancient Mariner declared). There are those who find all this extremity a little unbearable. But Dostoevsky held ideals, and his work overflows with designs for... [read more]

A Flickering Presence

Ben Lerner, 10:04

reviewed by James Pulford

Ben Lerner’s debut novel, Leaving the Atocha Station, was an intense trip through the mind of an anxious American college student in Spain and the finest work of fiction to explore feelings of fraudulence and fakery since David Foster Wallace’s story ‘Good Old Neon.’ The narrator is alienated by the disconnect between his experience and his self-presentation – an issue deftly dramatised through the mesh of a foreign language and culture. In 10:04, Lerner’s latest novel, the 33-year... [read more]